When less means more

Published January 4, 2017

When it comes to money, more is more.
 
But when it comes to stuff, less is often more, as in:
  • Less paper cluttering your desk
  • Fewer pairs of socks crammed into your drawers
  • Not so many pots and pans packed into the cupboard
  • A shorter – or nonexistent – stack of paperwork.
A lot of people are trying to simplify or "minimize" their lives these days.
 
And why not? Experts across many fields say that when you have less, you have less to clean, less to fix and less to worry about. For example:
 
In her best-selling book “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” Japanese organizing expert Marie Kondo espouses purging all but the things in your life that bring you joy.
 
For many of us, that means saying goodbye to everything that’s not essential: sweatshirts, mugs, shoes, sale-rack deals and hand-me-down chairs; the list of what should go is different for everybody.
 
But the benefits of paring down are the same.
 
“Being organized is about having more time for yourself and enabling you to live a more balanced life,” Eva Selhub, M.D., the author of “Your Health Destiny: How to Unlock your Natural Ability to Overcome Illness, Feel Better, and Live Longer,” said on shape.com.
 
Organizing experts say having less clutter can save you time and money because you won’t be wasting time searching for that white shirt you want to wear, and you won’t be spending money buying a new white shirt because you couldn't find your old one.
 
Financial professionals add that getting your financial house in order can give you peace of mind because you know where you stand and what you need to do.
 
The National Credit Union Association says you can take steps toward minimizing clutter by “grabbing your checking account statement and analyzing your monthly purchases. If everything you've purchased has somehow enhanced your life, great!”
 
If not, you may want to start minimizing there.
 
So, at the beginning of the year, when many of us vow to change for the better, you can vow to make do with less.
 
In the end, you’ll find it reaps you more.